BEST DIY FACEMASKS

I actually started reesearch for this blog this spring when Covid-19 first presence in march. But Norway decided that facemasks is to difficult to use for the people of Norway, I kind of hung it right here. But now with Covid on the rise because traveling for a Norwegian is part of our basic needs😉.

After 1,5 weeks of recommendation to use masks in public transport , single use masks are to be found everywhere in the streets. You should think that disposing thrash into a trashcan shouldn’t be that hard, but obviously it is. One solution is to make your own fabric mask ❤️ It´s inexpensive, better for the invironment and better for your health. Yes breathing toxins from the prodution of single use masks have not been reesearched yet, but still other reesearch done from enveironmental toxins that we wear, eat and breathe does affect our health as a coctail effect we still does not know to what extent… I like to practise a better safe than sorry approch. If you want to do the same I suggest useing organic fabric, preferably dyed organic or with plant colors as well. If not just make sure you have washed it really well before you use it.

First is the choice of material, the ones that are proven to have the best effect according to medicalnewstoday.com is tightly woven cotton of 600 threads pr inch, and 2 sheets of chiffon made from polyester and spandex filter out 80-99% of partricles

Other materials that have done good is tightly woven cotton, (no, do not use a BANDANA) plus natural silk or flannel, and cotton quilt with cotton-polyester batting. Filters that have performed well is vacuum cleaner filters(not recommended in Norway) and Zwiffer refill dust cloths. It gets kind of technical when the best combination is a positively charged fabric and a negative charged fabric, but thats why you want to combine cotton with silk or a synthetic fiber. Anyhow what materials you choose, FIT of the mask is everything, it needs to be snug.

Materials NOT to use, include knits, because they stretch and make the fabric have more filtration. So no tshirt and sock masks should ever be made and used.

I made this fitted mask pattern that graded in 3 sizes. I find my 6 year old fit the small, myself the medium and my hubby the Large

Old school pattern drawn by hand

What you need

  • Printed pattern on A4 paper
  • Paper scissors
  • Fabric scissors
  • Woven cotton fabric min 30 cm x 21 cm
  • Filter fabric min 30 cm x 21 cm (silk or polyester chiffon) I will use polyester originally made to filtrate pollen
  • Polyester or silk fabric min 30 cm x 21 cm
  • Elastic band 6 mm
  • Metal tread ( 8 – 10 cm)
  • Measuring tape
  • Pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Matching thread
  • Iron board
  • Iron

What to do

1. Use the paper scissor and cut out the preferred size

2. Iron the fabrics, remember different temperature for different fabrics

3. Fold the fabric, remember to fold with the direction of the tread in the fabric.

4. Pin the pattern on the fabric and cut around. Do the same with all the fabric layers

5. Pin together the mask front and sew a seam with 1 cm seam-allowance. Do the same with all the pieces

6. Iron down the middle of the seam, so the edges fold to each side. Use the edge of your Iron board. Do the same on all the pieces except. Remember the right temperature to each fabric

7. Cut small triangles in the seam allowance along the curvy seam on all pieces.

8. Pin the front of the mask together with the back with the seams facing out. Then fasten the filter ontop of the front with the seam-allowance facing inwards.

9. Sew a seam over the 3 layers on top of the mask and on the bottom with 1 cm allowance.

10. Cut off extra fabric on nose and chin.

11. Turn the face mask inside out.

12. Iron the edges.

13. Fold the metal wire after the shape of the nose.

14. Insert the metal wire and pin the edges down, marking with a pin where is starts and ends.

15. Sew one seam with stitches 4 mm, 0,3 cm from the edge. When getting to the wire sew around it at approx 0,75 cm.

16. Sew a topstitch seam on the bottom of the mask as well, 4 mm, 0,3 from the edge.

Point 17. 19. 20. 22

17. Pin all the 3 layers down in the remaining openings and sew a seam on both sides.

18. Try on the face mask and measure around the head (or around the ears) from one edge to another with a measuring tape. Measure the width of the mask. Add all the measures together and then add 2 cm. Size Large can look like this 43 cm (back head)+ 32 cm(neck) + 7 cm (side length) + 2 cm (seam allowance) = 84 cm. Cut the elastic band in the total measurement. Or you can just make a rough cut at 84 and avoid the math.

Point 18

19. Measure 1,5 cm, fold 0,5 cm around the elastic band, fold again so the measure is 1 cm. Iron and pin down. Make sure the elastic is loose and away from any pin.

20. Sew 0,2 cm from the edge with a 0,4 mm stitch. Repeat on the other side.

21. Try on the face mask to adjust the length of the elastic band. Then pin the ends together, let them overlap at 1 cm. Sew a zigzag seam back and forth to fasten. Adjust the elastic to hide the seam within one of the sides.

FINITO 💚👌🏼 enjoy your custom fitted face mask. Now you can experiment with all kinds of printed fabric or colors to match your outfits. Bring some FUN into Facemasks. They might be around for a while

STAY SAFE 😷✌🏼

DIY-Baby Cap

 

Baby Cap (3)

Finally I got around to post part 3 of #thesweaterchallenge. Did I mention this is “slow” fashion? 😀

So this is the first cap I have done with making a pattern first. Because I didn’t make a try first the pattern was not flawless and I had to make some tweaks during the process. Buut I have fixed it for for and I will break it down for you so you get the better part of this DIY. Making mistakes is a important part of the learning process 😉 ❤

What you need

Cap

  • Sweater for redesign
  • Measuring tape
  • Baking paper or pattern paper
  • Pins
  • Rulers, straight and bent
  • Sewing needle or sewing machine
  • Thread in matching color
  • Fabric paint
  • Small paintbrush
  • Sissors

Bow

  • Lace approx 2 cm wide
  • Ribbon 1,5 cm wide
  • Ribbon 0,5 cm wide
  • Sewing needle
  • Thread in matching color
  • Pins

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  1. The first thing I did was creating a pattern for the cap. I used baking paper 😉 The length of the head plus seam allowance made 41 cm. Height was 21 cm.  Make a square with a ruler, then divide this into 4 equal parts (41 / 4 = 10,25 cm). Mark the middle of each square 5,1 cm. Along the height of each square measure 11,5 cm, from this point use a rounded ruler and make a line from this point onto the middle of each square (your pattern will look a little different from  mine, since I was a little to lazy to do a try cap first, I just fixed the shape directly while sewing) Cut out the pattern, attach to the fabric with pins. Then cut out your fabric.
  2. Pin the ends together as shown on the picture. Then sew it together using a sewing machine with a elastic seam or do it by hand. Stop approx 0,5 cm from the top.
  3. Fold the cap the other way, pin and sew it together. Here is where you see the shape of the shape of the cap, if you think the corners are to sharp then you can adjust that by  rounding the corners a little more.

Design uten navn (16)

Making the ears

  1. Cut out two pieces of fabric that is approx 10 x 10 cm (mine was 10 x 8 cm, I wanted to use some leftover fabric )
  2. Fold the longest part in two, and sew one side. Do the same on the other piece
  3. Fold the inside out, then iron it.
  4. Then fold the corners into the middle, Hand sew the corners together going through the fabric in the front as well. Then the ears will not look so flat in the front.
  5. Figure out the placement on the ears on the cap. Measure the same from the top on both sides. Cut open and insert the ears. Sew the cap back together.
  6. Use a scissor and cut off the extra of the ears on the inside, and any loose threads.

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Folding the rib

  1. If the rib will be folded, it would look prettier if the seam is not visible. Cut open the seam in the back. Fold the seam-allowance outwards, make a tiny cut (0,3 cm) where the rib starts. This will make the seam look prettier on the outside. 😉
  2. Measure the fold before ironing. Mine is double, so in the end it measured 3 cm.
  3. To make the fold stay, sew small point stitches along the inside of the cap. I think I had 5 points where is stitched the rib to the cap.

And yeah, as you see I decided to paint the ears white in the inner part.  Very easily done with fabric some fabric paint and a paintbrush 😉

Design uten navn (18)

Making the bow

  1. Choose your materials. I wanted the materials to show, so I chose the lace and the ribbons in different sizes.
  2. Choose the size of the ribbon. and cut the total length of it mine is 16 cm. This makes it 7 cm when it is folded. Make sure the overlap is in the back. Hand sew one stitch to make it sit.
  3. The second ribbon is a little bit narrower and smaller, it is folded in 3 and total length is 24 cm. When it is folded it measures 6 cm.
  4. Place it and stitch it together with the lace.
  5. Then I cut the last ribbon, total length 18 cm. I tied it around the bow, and tightened it. Making sure the knot was in the back.
  6. Then I placed the bow on the cap and hand stitched it on. I cut the ribbon that was hanging from the cap and sealed the ends with a lighter.

 

The end ❤  Place work of art on cute baby ❤

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ARMS = LEG WARMERS

the expedition to (2)This post is the first of a series that I have called “the sweater challenge”. How many redesigned items can I actually make from a sweater? The intention is to use as much of the material as possible to create as little waste as possible. The items need to look nice, and be functional. ❤ Do you want to join me?  I will be posting on Instagram with the tag #zerowasteredesign.

Or you can just follow me on IG under CodegreenbySoAmamador or my private account SoAmador 😉

So the sweater I am using is a 100 % cotton knit in the color “ultimate snoring grey”.  (Sorry about the bad lighting in the photos, winter happened)

Design uten navn (6)

First up is making the arms into Leggings. Ooor what I will use them for…my thighs. I an choosing not to freeze this winter. UTI`s are soo LAST YEAR!

Equipment used

  • 1 ruler
  • 1 pair of sissors
  • Chalk for drawing
  • Lace with stretch
  • Sewing machine
  • Black thread
  • Measuring tape
  • Pins
  • Black fabric paint
  • Sponge
  • Plastic to cover the surface
  • Iron and ironboard
  • Cloth

Design uten navn (7)

  1. First I used used a ruler and chalk to make a straight line across the arm from the armhole. After cutting it, I folded the sleeve from the seam and out. Then I get to see if the line is straight or not. Cut away the extra fabric. Repeat on the second sleeve.
  2. I cut off the rib (saving that for another item).
  3. Do the same on the other sleeve. Double check that they are the same length by putting the sleeves on top of each other. Cut away fabric to make them even.
  4. Measure the circumcise of the top and bottom of the sleeve. Then add 2 cm. That is your measure. Then measure the lace and cut 4 lengths.
  5. So since I didn’t have a color that looked good with the grey, I used black fabric paint and a sponge and dabbed it on the lace. I let the lace dry, then I ironed it on the setting wool for 5 min with a cover over for protection. I could have gone over one more time with black paint, but I like the effect with a little pink shining through. It gets a little vintage feeling.
  6. Sew the ends of each lace together with seam allowance on 1 cm. Pin the lace to fabric. I chose to let the lace cover 1,5 cm of the hem. Then the effect of the lace as see through will be more visible, blending better with whatever pants I am wearing that day. I used a zigzag with 5 mm wide and 3 mm stitch to fasten the lace.

 

Then its done! Hope this can solve the problems of way to many sweaters with arms you got laying around.  Or maybe just some inspiration for a DIY-Christmas presents 😉

Thx for reading ❤ Here is ANOTHER picture with terrible lighting. The ELEVATOR picture! But what ya gonna do when winter came and stole the daylight 😉

codegreenbysoamador.wordpress.com (6)

What ya gonna do when the moth comes for you….

The Lilypad (2)

And for your favorite sweater? Cry for sure, and then throw it to the trash!

NOooooNOOOOoo. No need, it is fixable ❤

So first let me tell you a little about moths. Moths are creatures of the night spawned by demons that only eat your favorite wool and silk items or other fabrics made of protein. They are the evil and older sibling of the butterfly. They only eat your clothes during infancy, when they grow up they stop eating all together. Though some of them enjoy a sip of nectar now and then. But to continue their vicious cycle of destruction  they will lay their eggs in other beautiful pieces of fabric.

 

There are several ways to fix a moth whole and it depends on the material.

  1. If you have a big knitted sweater you can use the same colored yarn to fix it, I will include a link to a designer duo who is great with knit and show you how to fix your big knitted items here.
  2. You can add something on top of the whole, like a patch or if you are skilled with a needle you can make an embroidery.
  3. Add a piece of another material that has the same structure as the one that broke. Thin jersey works best with thin jersey and so on. Zigzag it together, hand stitch or use another elastic seam on your sewing machine. This is a great way if you have to patch up big wholes in your clothing.
  4. Or you can weave it together. It will not be as elastic as if you “knit it” back together. But it works better for smaller holes and very thin knitted materials. I will show you a tutorial on this method;

What you need:

  • Needle
  • Sizzors
  • Thread in matching color

Design uten navn (3)

So you see my holes, they are pretty small, but left unfixed the material will rip easily, making long stripes (so much harder to fix then). My technique is more like weaving.

You hand sew around the hole first, then tighten it a little to make the hole smaller. Then you sew up and down vertically, strengthening the material. Then you do the same horizontal.  I learned to fix wool socks from my mother with this technique 😉

Do you see where I fixed? I think it turned out pretty good even though my thread was black and not grey. The fun thing is that probably NO ONE will even notice the little uneven spot on the sleeve. You really have to have a trained eye for details to see that.

front

Strive for progress, not perfection

 

So what can you do to prevent the moth to devour the rest of your closet? 

-First you should freeze your suspected clothes. The eggs die at -8 degrees. Laundering is also an option for your pieces that can handle high temperatures. The moths do not eat fibers like cotton and bamboo or synthetics, but the eggs can hatch there and then they work their ways to the goodies by crawling. So its a good idea to wash it all.

-Deep Clean your wardrobe, they love the dirt and dust but hate soap and water. Vinegar and water also works fine. Clean your closet regularly, especially if you live in warmer climates.

-Before putting your clothes back for storage, clean them. They like old food spill, dandruff and skin particles. For longer storage put your items in cotton bags. Plastic will not let your clothes breathe and they might develop mold.

-Steer clear of mothballs, they contain a pesticide called Naphthalene. It can harm people, your pets and the environment.


Natural moth repellents;

  • Chedarwood, looses its scent and has to be replaced regularly.
  • Lavender is hated by moths for centuries. Use lavender bags or dip cotton balls in essential oil
  • Cinnamon. Replace sticks regularly. Essential oil will also work
  • Cloves also has a repellent effect.

Do NOT use: lemon, mint, eucalyptus and bay leaf essential oils (as well as the dried herbs). They actually seems to feed the moths…. 😦 

Hope you ppl liked this diy moth fixer 😉 ❤